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Dennistoun Online: Scottish+Nursery+Songs
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Ane an' be Dune wi't.


If folk wad be cautious when takin’ a drappy,
And mind they maun eat as weel’s drink to be happy,
They’d be better acquaint wi’ the grocer and dealer,
Nor be shouther-for-shouther wi’ beagle or jailor:—
They micht blaw their ain whistle, and play a gude tune wi’t,
If they had but the sense to tak’ ane an’ be dune wi’t;
   Ane an’ be dune wi’t, ane an’ be dune wi’t—
   An’ no to be daidlin’ frae Tintock to Troon wi’t,
   An’ wastin’ their time,—but tak’ ane an’ be dune wi’t.

A dram wi’ an auld frien’, I ne’er saw the harm in’ t;
In gi’en an’ takin’, there’s something sae warm in’t,
Ane sits rather langer than maybe he should do,
An’ spends somethin’ mair than he otherwise would do—
The night has its pleasures, but morning this croon wi't—
Aye tak’ my advice, just tak’ ane an’ be dune wi’t;
   Ane an’ be dune wi’t, ane an’ be dune wi’t—
   An’ dinna be sochrin’ frae July to June wi’t,
   An’ wastin’ your time, but tak’ ane an’ be dune wi’t.

A cheerie gudewife, wi’ a smile where a frown was,
That helpit ye up, aye, in a ’ your bit downfa’s;
A cup o’ gude tea, then, instead o’ your drummock;
A groat in your pouch, for a gill in your stomach;
A guid coat on your back, and a pair o’ new shoon wi’t—
O these are the comforts o’ ane an’ be dune wi’t—
   Ane an’ be dune wi’t, ane an’ be dune wi’t;
   For folk wha are tipplin’ a hale winter’s moon wi’t
   Are laughed at for fools,—so tak’ ane an’ be dune wi’t.






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